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If you see no such thing, the plant likely hasn't been grafted, so there's no.

Apr 02, It is generally better to cut the entire stem. Trimming lilacs is best accomplished using clippers. Remove spent blooms all the way to the stems to prevent seeding and encourage more blooms later on. Cut back about a third of the branches. Cut away shoots growing near the ground that may be sprouting from the main trunk. Jul 08, If you can't stand the look of your old lilac or you just want a quicker approach, you can take the drastic measure of cutting back the entire plant to about 6 to 8 inches above the ground in the early spring.

Fertilize the plant with compost or a. Shrub lilacs and bush lilacs are short and compact. Tree lilacs can grow up to 25 feet ( m.) high and have a tree-like appearance, but their many stems tend to get them classified as bushes. They are not technically trees, but they get big enough that you can treat them as if.

Apr 28, If the trunks are very thick, you may need a saw.

Cut each branch back by 1/3 to 1/2. The lilac will grow back, but it'll take a season or two.

I am sure it bloomed really well….

If you discovered that your plant was grafted, be sure not to cut below the graft%(4). Wonderful. But sometimes the older lilac get so overgrown and aged, they seem to stop blooming all together.

Now that’s a sad thing that we can try and do something to fix! What you need is young new growth. Now if you are a good and regular pruner, your lilac probably blooms well since you take care of it each year. As soon as the lilac bush's flowers are dead, trim each flower stem back to the leaves, removing all trace of the flowers.

This step stops the lilac from using its energy to make seeds.

If possible, trim them a bit below ground level for a neater appearance.

Aug 27, There are many great plants including resistant lilacs that could be good replacements. You can find some of them in the Plant Elements of Design plant database. Is the lilac at the end of its life? Lilacs are relatively long-lived plants (25 years to 50+ years) depending on how they have been cared for and their growing conditions.